John Deas Thomson

The naval administrator was an early member of Charlotte Chapel, having had three of his children baptised there by 1800. When his career progressed, however, and he rose to the position of Accountant-General to the Royal Navy and then gained a knighthood, he moved to London.

Lived
c.1763 - 21 February 1838. Died at Farleigh Priory, Maidstone, Kent (8).
Origin
Edinburgh
Father
John Thomson, also an officer of the civil department of the Navy.
Mother
Catherine Deas, only daughter of Mr David Deas. (7)
Address
From 1797 to 1800 he lived at 34 Princes Street.
Estate
He owned land at Norton, Ratho, from 1810. He later moved to Farleigh Priory, Maidstone, Kent.
Profession
In 1798 he and his father were amongst four people in Edinburgh licensed to sell state lottery tickets (9). In 1801 he was 'Naval Officer and store-keeper' based in Leith. He became accountant-general to the Royal Navy, appointed in 1805 as a 'Commissioner without special functions' (6). In 1832 he received a knighthood of the Royal Hanoverian Guelphic Order. (4)
Religious Views
He subscribed a guinea annually to the Edinburgh House of Industry (10)
Assessed taxes 1811
His house in Ratho had 14 windows and a rental value of £15.
Chapel connection
1797, 1799, 1800, baptisms
Spouse
Rebecca Freer
Married
3 May 1787 in Johns Island, Colleton Co., SC
Children
Susan Boone (c.1791-1816), Henry (1795 - 31 May 1809), Charles Freer (1797), John Deas (1799), Edward Carson (1800-1879, Australian administrator, politician and chancellor of the University of Sydney (3))

Sources

  1. Registers of Charlotte Chapel (NAS CH12/3)
  2. Edinburgh Post Office Directory 1818
  3. 'Edward Deas Thomson' in Wikipedia, accessed 10 January 2012
  4. Gentleman's Magazine vol.152 (1832) p.262
  5. 'Gogar Mount' in Edinburgh Survey of Gardens and Designed Landscapes (Peter McGowan, 2008) online (PDF), accessed 10 January 2012
  6. William Clowes, The Royal Navy, A History, vol.5 (London, Sampson Low, 1900) p.4
  7. 'Death of Sir Edward Deas Thomson' in Sydney Morning Herald, 4 August 1879
  8. The Standard 23 February 1838
  9. True Briton 29 November 1798
  10. Caledonian Mercury 2 August 1804, 2 September 1805

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